Index

O

Oakley, Ward, and the later Oxford Movement, Apo., 163-71;
—— 'I think it was Mr. Oakley's view that he might "profess all Roman doctrine" in the Church of England: I never took this view,' Apo., 396, 397.

Obedience, P.S., i., 230, 237;
—— test and evidence of faith, P.S., ii., 153, 157-9;
—— identified with faith, P.S., iii., 81-7; Diff., i., 269-74;
—— Hammond's dying commendation of, P.S., iii.. 205;
—— only way of seeking God, P.S., iv., 332;
—— in connection with ecclesiastical order, P.S., vii., 240, 241;
—— 'seek truth in {106} the way of obedience,' P.S., viii. 198;
—— as necessary since Christ's coming as before, ib., 203, 204, 205;
—— 'circumstances are the very trial of obedience,' U.S., 141, 142;
—— the condition of our continuance in grace, Jfc., 184;
—— justification by obedience, in what sense sound doctrine, ib., 182-4;
—— 'man is born to obey quite as much as to command,' Ess., i., 391;
—— obedience our only safety and comfort, Ess., ii., 343;
—— 'we do not augur much good of any one who does not in the first instance throw himself into the system under which he has been born,' Ess., ii., 400;
—— Jesuit obedience, Dev., 399;
—— ecclesiastical obedience (Heb. xiii., 7, 17), who claims it but the Pope? Diff., ii., 225, 226;
—— 'absolute obedience' (Mr. Gladstone's phrase), due neither to Pope nor Queen, Diff., ii., 243;
—— obedience of faith, S.N., 11, 12; L.G., 203, 204; G.A., 191; Apo., 246, 252;
—— obedience on habit and obedience on custom, P.S., i., 75.

Office, Divine, perpetual celebration of in choir, Jfc., 338, 339;
—— Bp. Cosin's Hours of Prayer, V.M., ii., 403, 404;
—— metrical versions of Breviary hymns, V.V., 212-75;
—— Newman's Breviary, late Hurrell Froude's, Apo., 74, 75.

Open churches, P.S., ii., 397, 398; P.S., iii., 333;
—— daily service at St. Mary's commenced, ib., iii., 310-6.

Old Testament Types, Abraham and Lot, P.S., iii., 1 sq.;
—— Samuel, ib., iii., 19-26; P.S., viii., 17 sq.;
—— Saul, P.S., iii., 29 sq.; P.S., viii., 33 sq.;
—— David, P.S., iii., 44 sq.; P.S., viii., 48 sq.;
—— Jeroboam, P.S., iii., 60 sq.;
—— Moses, P.S., vii., 118 sq.;
—— Josiah, P.S., viii., 91 sq.;
—— Jeremiah, ib., viii., 124 sq.;
—— Joshua, S.D., 150 sq.;
—— Elisha, S.D., 164 sq.;
—— Elijah, S.D., 367 sq.;
—— Balaam, P.S., iv., 18 sq.;
—— Korah, ib., iv., 267 sq.;
—— Esau, P.S., vi., 15-21;
—— Jacob, P.S., v., 75-82;
—— Solomon, Mix., 133-8.

Opinion, a notional assent to the probability of a proposition, G.A., 58-60;
—— differs from Inference and Credence, ib.;
—— sometimes identified, sometimes contrasted with Conviction, ib.

Ordination, sometimes compulsory in the early Church, P.S., iv., 60, 61; P.S., vii., 70;
—— a venture upon the unknown, P.S., iv., 304;
—— thoughts still hard to command after ordination, U.S., 142;
—— day of ordination 'in the case of many men, the one great day of their lives, which cannot come twice,—solemn and joyful at the time, and ever afterwards fragrant in their memories,' Ess., ii., 84;
—— validity of heretical ordinations, V.M., i., pref., pp. lxxxv.-lxxxvii.; sometimes denied, Ath., ii., 85; not more than probable, Ess., ii., 81;
—— delivery of sacred vessels, Ess., ii., 82, 83;
—— ordination a concrete whole, cannot be cut up into bits, Ess., ii., 82;
—— special providence over the true Church to prevent a flaw in the transmission of Orders, Ess., ii., 86-9; V.M., i., pref., p. lxxxiv.;
—— mere nomination by the Church might have superseded any rite of Ordination, Ess., ii., 88;
—— 'what is the virtue of a clergyman's reading?' L.G., 28;
—— Anglican Orders, Ess., ii., 1, 2, 76-84; V.M., i., 345, notes; V.M., ii., 226; Ess., ii., 109-11; Apo., 341.

Oriel College, Oxford, foundation, Idea, 154, 155;
—— the first to open its fellowships, ib., 156;
—— Copleston and Davison of Oriel, champions of liberal education {107} against utilitarianism of Edinburgh Review, ib., 156-76;
—— Newman's fellowship, 1822-45, Apo., 17, 232;
—— Provost Hawkins, Newman's indebtedness to, Apo., 8, 9;
—— 'the Oriel Common Room stank of Logic,' said before Newman came there, Apo., 169;
—— Oriel, 'the House or Hall of Blessed Mary,' where Newman was 'brought under the shadow of our Lady,' S.N., 102; 'in whose College I lived, whose Altar I served,' Apo., 165.

Origen, exculpated from heterodoxy, Ari., 97-9;
—— the 'labour-loving' Origen, says Athanasius, wrote some things as enquiring and exercising himself, not as expressive of his own sentiments, Ath., i., 44, note, 47, 48;
—— paralleled with Diodorus of Tarsus and Theodore of Mopsuestia, Dev., 194, 195;
—— no Protestant, H.S., i., 406;
—— his characteristic fault, to prefer scientific reasonings to authority, Diff., ii., 143;
—— 'I love the name of Origen: I will not listen to the notion that so great a soul was lost: but I am quite sure that his opponents were right, and he was wrong,' Apo., 259.

Original sin, doctrine of, 'very humbling,' 'it is our very nature that is sinful,' P.S., i., 87;
—— infection of nature, P.S., v., 52, 53, 132-5, 149;
—— 'our guilt is forgiven, the infection remains,' ib., v., 212;
—— the Christian 'conscious both of original and actual sin,' ib., v., 320;
—— remnants of, P.S., vii., 186-8;
—— learnt by experience of self, P.S., viii., 117;
—— 'at the fall we did not become other beings, but forfeited gifts added to us at our creation,' U.S., 281;
—— not inconsistent with some natural good, Jfc., 89-91;
—— Adam lost something distinct from and above his human nature, Jfc., 159, 160; the one main thing that Adam lost was 'the presence of God the Holy Ghost in him,' Jfc., 160;
—— doctrine gradually developed, Dev., 126, 127, 192;
—— effects of original sin, Mix., 169; a loss, not of natural reason, but of supernatural light, Mix., 170, 171;
—— original sin suggested by the evil in the world, Apo., 242; M.D., 458-62; G.A., 397-9;
—— like the tearing off of a skin, S.N., 57;
—— state of original sin, deprivation of grace and of 'integrity,' S.N., 174, 175, 232, 295;
—— evil of original sin man can remedy in all matters of this world, but not of his soul, S.N., 177; V.V., 355, 356;
—— 'this stripped human nature is called in Scripture the flesh; the world a creation of the flesh,' S.N., 233;
—— savagery one of the consequences of original sin, V.V., 355, 356;
—— a deprivation of 'a superadded fulness of grace,' not, as the Protestant false notion has it, something positive, Diff., ii., 47, 48;
—— 'our doctrine of original sin is not the same as the Protestant doctrine: Protestants [cf. P.S., ll. cc.] hold that it is a disease, a radical change of nature, an active poison internally corrupting the soul, infecting its primary elements and disorganizing it,' Diff., ii., ib.

Oscott College, description of, O.S., 175;
—— Dr. Weedall its builder, ib., 255; his life, ib., 253-60; character, ib., 260;
—— the tree beside the waters, ib., 245-7;
—— first Synod of Oscott, O.S., 1575-8.

Oxford, University of, 'the most religious University in the world,' Ess., ii., 409;
—— 'fair {108} city, seated among groves, green meadows, and calm streams,' Dev., 98;
—— in bygone days, 'a very dear place, but a very idle one, one Long Vacation, loved for its own sake, and enjoyed with scarce a thought of what was outside of it,' H.S., iii., 235, 236, 316, 317;
—— St. Frideswide, H.S., iii., 318-20;
—— Oseney Abbey, ib., 321-3;
—— Benedictine foundations, ib., 323, 324;
—— group of Colleges preserving the memory of Alfred, ib., 325, 328;
—— collegiate system, H.S., iii., 329;
—— 'pigmarket,' origin of the name, ib., 327;
—— 'such is the vitality, such the reproductive powers of this celebrated University,' H.S., iii., 331;
—— advice to the two ancient Universities, 'it is their very place to be old-fashioned,' ib., 331;
—— 'Oxford has failed in all respects as often as it has affected new fashions, or yielded to external pressure,'—honorary degrees for Dissenters, H.S., iii., 332;
—— 'Oxford has, and ever has had, what men of the world will call a Popish character,' H.S., iii., 333, 334;
—— 'stand upon the vestiges of the old city, and find a talisman among the ruins: the talisman is faith,' H.S., iii., 334;
—— proposal A.D. 1819 to make Oxford a Garden City, H.S., iii., 24, 25, 27;
—— advantages of site, ib., 27-30;
—— early nineteenth century Oxford exemplifying the reign of Law without Influence, System without Personality, H.S., iii., 75, 76;
—— Vacarius and Robert Pullus at Oxford, ib., 169-71;
—— Irishman's Street, Oxford, ib., 206;
—— what an Oxford College means, H.S., iii., 189, 190, 213-5;
—— Colleges in Oxford and Cambridge, the best protected interests in the country, ib., 233-5; too strong for the University, which has no real jurisdiction over them, ib., 235-7;
—— Halls, H.S., iii., 217, 237, 238;
—— the old Hebdomadal Board, an oligarchy of twenty-four, ib., 238, 239;
—— how the University reformed itself, Idea, 1, 2; Apo., 286, 287;
—— lectures on Political Economy at, Idea, 88-93;
—— Universities of Oxford and London compared, Idea, 145-8;
—— attacked by Edinburgh Review, ib., 154, 157, 160-3;
—— decadence and torpor of the Theology Schools there (A.D. 1820), Idea, 395, 396;
—— worldliness of Oxford, L.G., 256-8; P.S., iv., 6-11;
—— Oxford and Cambridge, L.G., 309;
—— distant view of, lost for ever, ib., 353-5;
—— the black willow-leaves, ib., 374, 375;
—— publicity of life in an Oxford College, Prepos., 123;
—— Alfred's jewel in the Ashmolean, Prepos., 309;
—— St. Bat's, L.G., 12-5;
—— The Oxford Spy for 1810, quoted: Vice 'from its hardness takes a polish too,' G.A., 47;
—— 'No one mourns more than I over the state of Oxford, given up alas! to liberalism and progress, to the forfeiture of her great medieval motto, "Dominus illuminatio mea,"' Diff., ii., 268.

Oxford Movement, rapid spread of, Ess., i., 263-6, 272; O.S., 136;
—— causes, power of the Prayer Book, withdrawal of State protection, reaction against sectarianism, writings of Sir Walter Scott and Coleridge, Ess., i., 267-71;
—— its excesses, 'there will be ever those who are too young to be wise, too generous to be cautious, too warm to be sober, or too intellectual to be humble,' Ess., i., 277; L.G., 20, 21;
—— hopes and fears in 1842, S.D., {109} 115, 116;
—— discouraged by authority, so far even as to provoke secessions to Rome, S.D., 340, 341, note, 407, 408;
—— prospects in 1846, Ess., ii., 440, 441, 446-8;
—— converts to Catholicism from the Movement, what was said of them, Prepos., 356-8, 377;
—— the stayers behind in Anglicanism, Mix., 255-7;
—— the Movement 'a mere party in the National Church, having had the least possible influence over the National Church itself,' Diff., i., 10, 11, 34, 35;
—— general indifference to the principles of the Movement, Diff., i., 59-62;
—— positively unpopular, the surplice riot, Diff., i., 62-5;
—— the first principle of the Movement was ecclesiastical liberty; the object of its attack was Erastianism, Royal Supremacy, the Establishment as such, Diff., i., 101-3, 130;
—— 'they did not understand that the Established Religion was set up in Erastianism,' that they were doing for the Establishment 'the most intolerable of disservices,' Diff., i, 105, 106;
—— episcopal Charges against the Movement, names called on both sides, Diff., i., 109-12, 152;
—— 'it (Movement) cannot strengthen it (Establishment), it cannot serve it, it cannot obey it: one or other must perish,' Diff., i., 113;
—— 'a movement is a thing that moves,' 'you must secede,' 'you must take up your cross and go hence,' Diff., i., 124, 125, 129;
—— pleas for remaining, Diff., i., 122, 123, 127-9;
—— doctrine of the Movement built upon the Prayer Book, the Prayer Book upon the Anglican Divines, the Divines upon the Fathers, Diff., i., 131-49;
—— took to the Fathers chiefly as anti-Protestant, Diff., i., 143-6; amazed to find them Roman, ib., 150, 151;
—— their successors can only remain Anglicans by a monstrous assertion of what the party originally disowned, private judgment, 160-3;
—— 'the Movement looks away from the Establishment, "let us go hence" is its motto,' Diff., i., 167, 168;
—— the starting-day, 14 July, 1833, Apo., 35;
—— leaders, ib., 36-41, 98;
—— its principles, dogma, Church, Sacraments, Bishops, no Popery, Apo., 48-52, 55;
—— 'would not allow that we were a party,' ib., 59;
—— Pusey joins the Movement, gave it a position and a name (1835-6), Apo., 61-3;
—— the Movement at its height, Apo., 69-72, 75, 76, 93-9;
—— history of Tract 90, Apo., 78-9;
—— Newman's place in the Movement lost, ib., 89;
—— Oakley, Ward, the later stage of the Movement, 163, 164, 165, 171;
—— Oxford Lives of the English Saints, Apo., 210-2, 323-38;
—— severe things written by Catholic priests about the Movement, Diff., ii., 4, 5;
—— what attracted it to Rome, Diff., ii., 198;
—— a manifesto of the Movement, U.S., 301, 302.

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