Newman Reader
Arians of the Fourth Century
John Henry Newman

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Contents
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Title Page

Revised September, 2002.

 

Contents

The book's table of contents has more detailNR.

Chapter
Page
I.
Schools and Parties in and about the Ante-Nicene Church, in their relation to the Arian heresy


1. The Church of Antioch      1.

2. The Schools of the Sophists    25.

3. The Church of Alexandria    39.

4. The Eclectic Sect  100.

5. Sabellianism  116.

II. 

The Teaching of the Ante-Nicene Church in its relation to the Arian Heresy


1. On the principle of the formation and imposition of Creeds  133.

2. The Scripture doctrine of the Trinity  151.

3. The Ecclesiastical doctrine of the Trinity  156.

4. Variations in the Ante-Nicene Theological Statements  179.

5. The Arian Heresy  201.
III.  The Ecumenical Council of Nicæa, in the Reign of Constantine

1. History of the Nicene Council  237.

2. Consequences of the Nicene Council  259.
IV.  Councils in the Reign of Constantius

1. The Eusebians  275.

2. The Semi-Arians  297.

3. The Athanasians  311.

4. The Anomœans  337.
V.  Councils after the Reign of Constantius

1. The Council of Alexandria in the Reign of Julian  357.

2. The Ecumenical Council of Constantinople in the Reign of Theodosius  377.


Chronological Table

 397.

Appendix
Note 1. The Syrian School of Theology  403.

2. The early doctrine of the divine gennesis  416.

3. The Confessions at Sirmium  423.

4. The early use of usia and hypostasis  432.

5. Orthodoxy of the faithful during Arianism
    [On Consulting the Faithful]
 445.

6. Chronology of the Councils  469.

7. Omissions in the text of the Third Edition  474.

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{v} THE following work was written in the early part of last year, for Messrs. Rivington's "Theological Library;" but as it seemed, on its completion, little fitted for the objects with which that publication has been undertaken, it makes its appearance in an independent form. Some apology is due to the reader for the length of the introductory chapter, but it was intended as the opening of a more extensive undertaking. It may be added, to prevent mistake, that the theological works cited at the foot of the page, are referred to for the facts, rather than the opinions they contain; though some of them, as the "Defensio Fidei Nicenæ," evince gifts, moral and intellectual, of so high a cast, as to render it a privilege to be allowed to sit at the feet of their authors, and to receive the words, which they have been, as it were, commissioned to deliver.

[October, 1833.]

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{vi} A VERY few words will suffice for the purpose of explaining in what respects the Third Edition of this Volume differs from those which preceded it.

Its text has been relieved of some portion of the literary imperfections necessarily incident to a historical sketch, its author's first work, and written against time.

Also, some additions have been made to the footnotes. These are enclosed in brackets, many of them being merely references (under the abbreviation "Ath. Tr.") to his annotations on those theological Treatises of Athanasius, which he translated for the Oxford Library of the Fathers.

A few longer Notes, for the most part extracted from other publications of his, form an Appendix.

The Table of Contents, and the Chronological Table have both been enlarged.

No change has been made any where affecting the opinions, sentiments, or speculations contained in the original edition,—though they are sometimes expressed with a boldness or decision which now displeases him;—except that two sentences, which needlessly reflected on the modern Catholic Church, have, without hurting the context, been relegated to a place by themselves at the end of the Appendix.

April, 1871.

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Title Page

THE

ARIANS

OF

THE FOURTH CENTURY

 

BY

JOHN HENRY CARDINAL NEWMAN

Fret not thyself because of the ungodly, neither be thou envious against
the evil doers. For they shall soon be cut down like the grass, and be
withered even as the green herb. Put thou thy trust in the Lord, and be
doing good; dwell in the land, and verily thou shalt be fed.
PSALM xxxvii. 1-3.

 

NEW IMPRESSION

 

LONGMANS, GREEN, AND CO.
39 PATERNOSTER ROW, LONDON
NEW YORK, BOMBAY, AND CALCUTTA

1908

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