Characteristics
from the writings of
John Henry Newman
Edited by William Samuel Lilly

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Contents

NOTE—The reference at the end of each selection is linked to the file wherein
that selection can be found in Newman Reader, but the page numbers given by
Lilly rarely correspond to the correct page numbers in the Newman Reader file
(which file generally is based on a later edition of the work).

Preface Page
Part I.—Personal
  1.  Early Religious Impressions      3.
  2.  First Years of Residence at Oriel      9.
  3.  Mr. Keble's Teaching    12.
  4.  Hurrell Froude    15.
  5.  The Teaching of Antiquity    18.
  6.  Travels in the South of Europe    23.
  7.  The Tracts for the Times    26.
  8.  Dr. Pusey [file 2]    33.
  9.  The Via Media    36.
10.  Growth of the "Anglo-Catholic" Party    38.
11.  Tract Ninety    39.
12.  "Securus Judicat Orbis Terrarum"    43.
13.  Three further Blows    50.
14.  From 1841 to 1845    52.
15.  Reception    59.
16.  Since 1845    61.
17.  The Anglican Church seen from Without    62.
18.  Letter to Father Coleridge on Anglican Orders    66.

Part II.—Philosophical
  1.  Intellectual Education pre-eminently a Discipline in Accuracy of Mind    71.
  2.  The Popular Conception of an "Intellectual Man"    74.
  3.  The Origin of Political and Religious Watchwords    76.
  4.  Real Apprehension of the Affections and Passions possible only by Experience    77.
  5.  Realization {xiv}    78.
  6.  Our Notions of Things merely Aspects of them    80.
  7.  How Men really Reason in Concrete Matters    82.
  8.  Intellectual Obstructions    92.
  9.  The Laws of the Mind the Expression of the Divine Will    93.
10.  First Principles    94.
11.  The Ethics of Culture    96.
12.  Culture and Vice  103.
13.  The World's Philosophy of Religion  105.
14.  The Doctrine of Retributive Punishment [file 2]  109.
15.  What is Theology?  111.
16.  Physical Philosophy and Theology  117.
17.  The Baconian Philosophy  119.
18.  Rationalism  122.
19.  The God of Monotheism and the God of Rationalism  126.
20.  The "Duty of Scepticism"  130.
21.  Apprehension of God through the Conscience  131.
22.  Hume's Argument against the Jewish and Christian Miracles  139.
23.  Gibbon's "Five Causes"  141.
24.  The Principle of Faith  146.

Part III.—Historical
  1.  English Jealousy of Church and Army  153.
  2.  Irish Discontent  157.
  3.  The Northman Character  162.
  4.  Northman and Norman  165.
  5.  Athens  167.
  6.  Oxford  173.
  7.  St. Benedict and Early Monachism  175.
  8.  The Death of St. Bede  179.
  9.  Abelard  182.
10.  Pope Liberius [file 2]  187.
11.  Death of St. Gregory VII.  188.
12.  Rome and Constantinople in 1566  189.
13.  The Election of St. Pius V.  190.
14.  The Battle of Lepanto  194.
15.  The Religious History of England  197.
16.  Catholicism in England from the Sixteenth to the Nineteenth Century  209.
17.  The Re-establishment of the Hierarchy {xv}  213.

Part IV.—Religious
Section I.—Protestantism
  1.  Protestantism and Historical Christianity  223.
  2.  Bible Religion  225.
  3.  Puritanism  227.
  4.  Muscular Christianity  228.
  5.  English Religious Ideas  229.
  6.  A Protestant View of Conversions  236.
  7.  Protestant Texts  239.
  8.  Protestant Image Worship  242.
  9.  The Right of Private Judgment or the Private Right of Judgment  243.
10.  The Rationale of Protestant Persecution  245.
11.  Protestantism drifting into Scepticism  247.
Section II.—Anglicanism
  1.  The Anglican View of the Visible Church  250.
  2.  The Branch Theory  252.
  3.  The Church of England  254.
  4.  Anglican Orders  258.
  5.  Anglican Ordinances  271.
  6.  The High Church Party  284.
  7.  The Christian Year [file 2]  286.
  8.  The Tractarian Movement  290.
  9.  Anglo-Catholic or Patristico-Protestant?  294.
10.  The Non-jurors and the Lesson they Teach  299.
11.  The Anglican Argument from Differences among Catholics  304.
12.  Anglican Objections from Antiquity  306.
13.  Invincible Ignorance and Anglicanism  313.
14.  Fundamental Difference between Catholicism and Anglicanism  319.
Section III.—Catholicism
  1.  Catholicism and the Religions of the World  320.
  2.  Faith in the Catholic Church  324.
  3.  Faith in any other Religious Body than the Catholic Church impossible  332.
  4.  Dispositions for joining the Catholic Church {xvi}  334.
  5.  No Logical Alternative between Catholicism and Scepticism  338.
  6.  A Convert  340.
  7.  Faith and Devotion  341.
  8.  Private Judgment among Catholics  345.
  9.  The Aim of the Catholic Church  347.
10.  The Religion of Catholics  356.
11.  The Privileges of Catholics  359.
12.  Integrity of Catholic Doctrine  361.
13.  Transubstantiation [file 2]  363.
14.  Mass  364.
15.  Benediction  366.
16.  Confession  367.
17.  Counsels of Perfection  368.
18.  Relics and Miracles  370.
19.  The Earliest Recorded Apparition of the Blessed Virgin  379.
20.  The Antecedent Argument for an Infallible Arbiter of Faith and Morals  381.
21.  The Practical Wisdom of the Holy See  385.
22.  The Obligations of Catholics to the Holy See  387.
23.  English Catholics and Pius IX.  391.
24.  Scandals in the Catholic Church  393.
25.  "Popular" Catholics  395.
26.  A Bad Catholic  398.
27.  The Idea of a Saint [file 3]  402.
28.  Lingering Imperfections of Saints; Personal and Temporary Errors of Popes  403.
29.  St. John Baptist  404.
30.  St. John Evangelist  406.
31.  St. Mary Magdalen  407.
32.  St. Augustine  410.
33.  St. Philip Neri  413.
34.  Mater Dei  416.
35.  Mater Purissima  419.
36.  Refugium Peccatorum  423.
37.  Sine Labe Originali Concepta  424.
38.  Maria Assumpta  432.
39.  Growth of the Cultus of Mary  435.
Index  439.

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Dedication

I dedicate this volume to

S. L. L.

who has done so much to lighten my labour and to
enhance my pleasure in compiling it.

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Title Page

CHARACTERISTICS

FROM THE WRITINGS OF

JOHN HENRY NEWMAN

BEING SELECTIONS

PERSONAL, HISTORICAL, PHILOSOPHICAL, AND
RELIGIOUS, FROM HIS VARIOUS WORKS

  ARRANGED BY

WILLIAM SAMUEL LILLY
OF THE INNER TEMPLE, BARRISTER-AT-LAW

WITH THE AUTHOR'S APPROVAL

Ille velut fidis arcana sodalibus olim
Credebat libris, neque si male cessarat unquam
Decurrens alio, neque si bene; quo fit ut omnis
Votiva pateat veluti descripta tabella
Vita senis.

 

NEW YORK:
SCRIBNER, WELFORD, & ARMSTRONG

1875

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Newman Reader — Works of John Henry Newman
Copyright 2007 by The National Institute for Newman Studies. All rights reserved.